It’s difficult to remove a bolt with a busted head, especially if you don’t want to use a drill. Many people become so frustrated while attempting it that they may end up causing more significant damage to the device or connection itself.

While utilizing a drill might supply an opening through which you can grab and remove the bolt, alternative options are available.

Is the bolt head completely destroyed, or have the edges been rounded off? Is the bolt now flush with the surface, or do you have something to grab? You may use this information to apply your preferred fixing technique.

13 Ways To Remove A Broken Bolt Without A Drill

1. Use a Hammer and Chisel

If the bolt head is only slightly damaged, you may be able to use a hammer and chisel to remove it. Place the chisel on the edge of the bolt head and tap it with the hammer until the bolt head breaks off. Then, use a wrench or pliers to remove the bolt.

2. Use a Hacksaw

If the bolt head is destroyed or the bolt is flush with the surface, you can use a hacksaw to remove it. First, make sure that the saw blade is very sharp. Then, insert the blade into the center of the bolt and start sawing. It may take some time, but eventually, you will be able to cut through the bolt.

3. Use a Dremel Tool

If you have a Dremel tool, you can use it to remove a broken bolt. First, insert a metal cutting disc into the tool. Then, place the disc on the bolt and start cutting. The Dremel tool will quickly cut through the bolt.

4. Use Heat

If you have a torch, you can use it to heat up the bolt. This will expand the metal and make it easier to remove. First, apply heat to the bolt for a few minutes. Then, use a wrench or pliers to remove the bolt while it is still hot.

5. Use Penetrating Oil

If the bolt is stuck, you can try using penetrating oil. First, apply the oil to the bolt and let it sit for a few minutes. Then, use a wrench or pliers to remove the bolt. The oil will help loosen the bolt and make it easier to remove.

6. Use an Impact Driver

If you have an impact driver, you can use it to remove a broken bolt. First, insert a drill bit into the impact driver. Then, place the drill bit on the bolt and start drilling. The impact driver will quickly remove the bolt.

7. Use Vise Grips

If you have vise grips, you can use them to remove a broken bolt. First, open the jaws of the vise grips wide enough to fit over the bolt. Then, Place the vise grips on the bolt and squeeze the handles together. The vise grips will grab onto the bolt and allow you to remove it.

8. Use an Air Impact Gun

If you have an air impact gun, you can use it to remove a broken bolt. First, insert the tip of the air impact gun into the center of the bolt. Then, pull the trigger to start the gun. The air impact gun will quickly remove the bolt.

9. Use a Hydraulic Jack

If you have a hydraulic jack, you can use it to remove a broken bolt. First, place the tip of the jack on the bolt. Then, pump the handle of the jack to raise the piston. The piston will push against the bolt and help to remove it.

10. Use an Oxygen Acetylene Torch

If you have an oxygen-acetylene torch, you can use it to remove a broken bolt. First, apply heat to the bolt for a few minutes. Then, use a wrench or pliers to remove the bolt while it is still hot.

11. Use a MIG Welder

If you have a MIG welder, you can use it to remove a broken bolt. First, insert the electrode of the welder into the center of the bolt. Then, strike an arc and hold it for a few seconds. The arc will weld the bolt to the metal and allow you to remove it.

12. Use a Bolt And Screw Extractor

If you have a bolt and screw extractor, you can use it to remove a broken bolt. First, insert the tip of the extractor into the center of the bolt. Then, twist the handle of the extractor to remove the bolt.

13. Use a Pipe Wrench

Back to the basic principles, this technique is particularly effective when dealing with a stripped bolt. Tighten the pipe wrench firmly to the bolt/nut and crank it until the bolts drop out. The grip you have on the bolt will be stronger as you crank.

Keep in mind that this method only works when at least ½ inch of the bolt to grip.

Conclusion

There are many ways to remove a broken bolt, and the method you choose will depend on the severity of the break and the available tools. If you are having difficulty removing a broken bolt, don’t panic!

There is likely a solution that will work for you. Try one of the methods we’ve suggested, or get creative and develop your own. With a bit of patience and perseverance, you will be able to remove the broken bolt and get on with your project.

Thanks for reading!